So God created man in his image,

in the image of God he created him;

male and female he created them.

And God blessed them. And god said to them, “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the whole earth and subdue it and have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the heavens and over every living thing that moves on the earth.

Genesis 1: 27, 28

 

How does God view life? This is a question that gets thrown about and discussed a great deal in both religious and in secular circles. It seems that most of the conversation on this topic is focused on the aspect of life as it exists prior to birth, and this is an important part of the definition of life and its value, but it is certainly not the only aspect of this discussion. In fact, I think that the bigger picture conversation regarding God’s view of the value of people is the real starting point for entering into one about the pre-born and how we view those lives. I submit that God cares greatly about each and every person who exists on the earth. There are none that have a greater or a lesser status or that are formed with an inferior make-up or right to be loved, cared about, and embraced as God’s own creation. Every one of us is a descendant of these first people, and as such, each of us has been blessed by the touch of the Creator, Himself, and is devised and formed in a manner that directly reflects that thing that the text calls the “image of God.”

 

If I stop to think about this for a while and ponder it with real consideration of what God is telling us about this valuable work of His own hands, I might begin to view other people differently. Each person that I encounter in any manner is a product of God’s personal workmanship. Every category of people that is defined by human thought and language is also made of individual people who may happen to have certain tangible characteristics or qualities in common but who are each also descendants from this creative beginning. Thus, there are no groups of people who do not deserve to be respected and whose value is less than others in the eyes of God. I believe that caring for all people of this earth is an important part of the responsibility to rule over the earth, this dominion, that God has charged us with doing as our primary calling in dwelling here. Thus, gender, race, religion, nationality, wealth or poverty, sexual identity or orientation, and even personality and temperament are not to be held up as cause for exclusion from engagement in caring for people and for being involved in the well-being of their existences.

 

Admittedly, this sort of involvement is difficult, and caring for people is never easy or simple. This is a hard world, and these are complex times in its history, but God tells us that we can turn to Him and that we can rely upon His wisdom, grace, strength, and provision during all of the hard times and with each of our difficult challenges in all aspects of life and living. Yet, God is clear on this, and He holds each moment of every life as precious and the existence of that life as above and beyond our authority to decide or determine. Human life and its duration are God’s to decide. This is a badly broken world, and there is violence and sinful disregard for God’s law of peace running loose in all corners of our planet. Although, God would have us turn to Him and rely upon His ability to heal all forms of hurts and settle every type of disagreement, there are times when people with destructive intent are present among us, and they require force and even violence to hold them in check. I hold that even these acts of self-defense and preservation run against God’s desire and will, but they are also covered by grace, forgiveness, and understanding on the part of the Creator. As to the loudest topic in this arena of the value of life, it seems clear to me that the unborn are people who are created and formed by God in His image, they have no capacity to speak for or to defend themselves, and their protection is of paramount importance in our God given mandate to rule justly over all of the earth.

For what great nation is there that has a god so near to it as the LORD our God is to us, whenever we call upon him?

Deuteronomy 4: 7

 

Moses was speaking about the way that things were in a time and a place long ago and far away. He was reminding everyone about the fact that God was as close to them as was their own breath and that the Lord was involved with His people and with their nation in all matters both great and small. This is the God that Moses had encountered and knew in a deeply personal manner, and this was the God who was truly and in all ways the Lord of and over the land. So much has changed from then until now. It seems that we think that we have become a people who know how to care for ourselves as we now govern our nations and rule over the people of our world with such great skill and success that there is no longer any need for submission and obedience to the ancient God of Moses and to the way of His Word and Law.

 

Actually, as we know from that same word that many of us want to set aside on the dusty shelves of antiquity, it didn’t take long for the people that Moses was addressing here to adopt the same attitude toward God and to attempt to go it on their own in the world. It did not work for them, and it does not work for us, either. We rule over our world with all of our sophistication and knowledge put to full use; yet, people are still starving and homeless, nations continue to settle their differences by waging war, the resources of our earth are squandered and destroyed to serve selfish desires, and life in all forms is treated as a disposable commodity instead of being viewed as God’s gift of Himself in this world. It seems that our attempt at going it on our own in governing and ruling over our world have not been very successful or productive after all.

 

Still, God is patient, and He is faithful to His promise of redemption. The Lord has not given up on us, and people who know the Lord should not give up hope either. I believe that our efforts will not save the world, for that is a work that Christ alone, in His final return, will accomplish. Yet, we are called upon by Him and given the task of bringing His grace, justice, mercy, peace, and their redemption into the world as we encounter and touch it. Our nations and their leaders may not embrace the truth and the counsel of God’s Word as their ongoing rule of law, but that doubt should not stop us or inhibit us from proclaiming its supremacy to them and from demanding that God’s ethical and moral principles be applied to the way that our lands are governed. Most of us have the right and the means to voice our understanding of what is righteous and proper in the way that our leaders guide the course of the nation. All of us have the ability to express these wishes and desires through prayer and as acts of worship to our one true and eternal King. People who know God, we can join with Moses and raise our voices in prayer to the Lord and in expressions of righteousness to the world. So, we should never be silent when it comes to God’s will and truth in our world.