For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to everyone who believes.

Romans 10: 4

We live in a world where double meanings are commonplace. People say things and their real intent is hidden inside of our surface understanding of their words. In other instances, a bit of archeology is required to dig down to the next layer of understanding. Regardless of the circumstances or of the intent of the speaker, there are times when looking beyond our first impressions matters for the sake of thorough understanding. This short sentence is one of those pieces of text. For at first reading it would be easy to think that the Apostle is stating the obvious in saying that Christ brought about the termination of the old Law of Moses. In a way, this is true; however, there is more here.

The idea behind the word that is translated as end is one of fulfillment, of the arrival of a completed state. There is a strong sense of the passage of time and of a work or a process that was required to get to this point. This is similar to the complex ideas that flow naturally from the expression, “End of the journey”. This statement brings to mind the planning that preceded the travel, the adventures that were encountered along the way, the great joy and satisfaction that come when the goal is achieved, and finally, the treasures that are to be found there. To me this is a description of God’s plan for our redemption from sin and for the restoration of our relationship with Him.

God gave us His Law so that we would have a code to follow that, if adhered to completely, would lead us to live in true righteousness. That is, we would think and act in a manner that was consistent with the way that God created us to do before our rebellion. Since this would require us to make the choice to live in this way, and doing this demands a form off perfection that is founded upon our own strength; it never did and could not ever succeed. Yet, God’s holiness demands our righteousness. So, Christ became the final destination of God’s journey with humanity. At this time, anyone who believes in the full expression of who and of what God is; that is, who believes in the fullness of Christ; that is, born of a virgin, lived among us as a man, crucified and raised from the dead, and living again with the Father as God; will be transformed into a person who is righteous and who now lives in the world that is found at the end of that journey. We do live under the full expression and authority of God’s Law, but now, in Christ, this is possible, and through the power of His Spirit, it is our life experience.    

Advertisements

Out of the anguish of his soul he shall see and be satisfied;

by his knowledge shall the righteous one, my servant,

make many to be accounted righteous,

and he shall bear their iniquities.

Isaiah 53: 11

 

Isaiah wrote these words about 700 years before Jesus was born; yet, He describes exactly what Jesus would accomplish in His short time with us on earth. He truly suffered in many ways. Jesus felt what the Father also feels, for the weight of people’s sin was heavy upon Christ throughout the days of His life. He walked in the paths of our pain, and He responded to the needs of our souls for reconciliation with God and for the deep healing that would bring about a return to dwelling in the presence of our Lord. Then, after living among us and entering into our lives for a period of time, Jesus took all that we had done to separate ourselves from holiness and He also grasped to Himself every aspect of sin that would come in the future so that anyone who would choose to be reconciled to God could be so saved. This great sacrificial act was needed so that you and I could know the fullness of life and enter into the reality of being alive for eternity.

 

So, Jesus brought many people out of death and into life. His offer of grace and peace with our Creator is extended to everyone; yet, some say yes to it and others continue to reject this free gift that Christ holds out to us. Because of the fact that many do not choose to hear and to accept the truth of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, God calls all of us who do know Him to speak out about this faith that has saved us and to live openly in the freedom that Christ has given to us in order for the world to see how and why submission to Christ brings about the sort of joy and peace that it does. Christ desires that each of His people would live so that our lives would be an on-going testimony to His great love and to the way that we have been released from captivity to sin. In Christ, we have a purpose in life that is noble and that conforms to God’s desire to redeem the world and that joins in His plan to accomplish this goal.

 

On that day over two thousand years ago Jesus carried away my sin, and He did the same for everyone else, too. Now we each are granted that opportunity to embrace God’s gift of redemption. If we have already done so and entered into the new life that Christ’s presence grants to us, then we are traveling along a road that leads ever farther into God’s will. This is a journey of faith that asks us to continually submit to the Lord and to yield ourselves to His transformative work within us. It is also a life of entering into the deep joy that comes from dwelling in Christ’s presence. For people who have not accepted the gift that Christ’s death and resurrection provide, this day grants to them an ideal time to turn life around by surrendering to the only one who can save the soul and to the singular source of that new life, Jesus Christ.

For you, O LORD, have made me glad by your work;

at the works of your hands I sing for joy.

Psalm 92: 4

 

God was working out His will in the ancient world of the psalmists, and He is still doing the same to this day. From the dawn of time the Lord has been engaged with His creation on all levels; so, it is not surprising to me to see His hand at work in the affairs of the world where I live. God cares about each of us, and He is very concerned about the way that we live out our lives. This concern and engagement were so great that God, Himself, lived among us to provide everyone with the way and the means to enter into on-going and eternal peace with Him. That baby, Jesus, whose birth we celebrate was the singular greatest work that God’s hand of mercy and grace has accomplished; yet, that work was intended to bring joy to the hearts of people such as myself.

 

My greatest joy is known through the presence of Christ in the world where I dwell, and it is made very real by His Spirit as He dwells within me. For God’s redemptive work is carried out on a grand, universal scale in our world, and it is also rendered on an intimately personal scale within the lives of individuals as we enter into relationship with Christ. It is in and through this relationship that gladness is brought to life, and it is in the companionship of the Spirit that life with its ups and downs, its trials and challenges, is perceived as a joyous event. God works in us to change our perspective on the events and the circumstances of life so that all of it can be understood as valuable and useful in our journey of faith. I know that without Christ in me, I would view my days very differently than I do in light of God’s wisdom, truth, and love.

 

When I consider God’s gift of Jesus, I am not taken immediately into a seasonal story and the festive activities that tend to surround its telling. Instead, I am made humble and also filled with peace and the joy that the writer of this psalm is expressing. In Christ, I have come to know that joy is internally generated by Christ’s Spirit, and so the true and lasting source of my joy is Christ in me. He works to transform my perspective on life to one that seeks to bring His love into all that I think and do. Although my efforts along these lines are weak and highly flawed, I know that Christ is at work to redeem even my poor attempts at spreading His joy in the world.

 

 

Now the LORD said to Abram, “Go from your country and your kindred and your father’s house to the land that I will show to you.

Genesis 12: 1

 

When Abram obeyed God in this matter, he became a pilgrim and a traveler, an immigrant. He left behind everything that gave him earthly identity, comfort, and safety; plus, he effectively walked away from his heritage as a man of some rank and privilege. But he was responding to God’s calling for him and upon his life. There was a very powerful promise of greatness through descendents that God gave to Abram, but that was certainly vague and intangible. What this man of rather ordinary faith knew was that he needed to pack up his household, his wife and the people who served them, his nephew Lot and his family and servants and leave home for foreign soil that was far away and probably dangerous for them.

 

He did all of this because God told him to. He entered into a life-changing journey of faith in response to a calling of the Lord that was too powerful and compelling to ignore or to set aside. The journey was a true adventure, and its narrative gives us many of the great accounts of God’s faithfulness, protection, and grace in the Bible. Yet, it all started with one person who knew God and responded to the Lord’s voice. Frankly, I have never been in Abram’s shoes. God has not given me directions that involved such bold and blind faith. My journey with Him has been shaped and formed in close connection with other people who have listened and responded to the Lord’s calling upon them. My steps through life have landed on soil that is close to the place of my birth. My morning sky is filled with the light of a very familiar sun.

 

However, there are aspects of my story that are very similar to Abram’s. The life journeys that all followers of Christ experience are also like Abram’s in certain ways. Christ calls us out of the false security of our birth identity, the comfort of family, and the familiar rules of culture, and He leads us into the foreign soil of the kingdom of God. If we take Christ’s demand upon our hearts and minds seriously, we become true immigrants in our world. We enter into a life of living outside of the secure connections that our earthly homes provide as we embrace the adventure and the restorative love that is at the center of Christ’s will for each of His people. Followers of Christ today are separated from Abram by thousands of years and live in a radically different world; yet, we are truly like him in many ways. God speaks to us. He gives us His will, the promise of His faithfulness to us, and He grants us the ability and the authority to bring life into the foreign lands where we now reside. Our part in it all is like Abram’s in that we need to pack up and go.