He has told you, O man, what is good; and what does the Lord require of you; 

But to do justice, to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?

Micah 6: 8

When I watch high level athletes competing in their sport, I am always amazed at the ease with which they perform so many very hard tasks under the pressure of the competitive environment. There is grace and balance in their movements that is well beyond what most of us are capable of achieving.  It is this same degree of balance that God wants us to seek in our walks with Him. Yet, it is even more important in the spiritual realm than it is in the athletic. For in our spiritual lives the stakes are much higher than any national championship, and the opposition is more focused and considerably more fierce.

Micah points out three characteristics to hold onto as we seek to live out God’s will in our world. Each of them is important; however, our most effective approach to life is found by embracing all three in a balanced combination that leads to a graceful and love-filled walk with the Lord. Justice without kindness can be harsh and often becomes self-serving; yet, when kindness stands on its own, people tend to be too accepting of the sinful behaviors and attitudes of others. That is no more loving than it is to stand in front of someone and shout at them about their failure to live up to God’s standards. Finally, if we embrace justice and kindness without the humility to recognize that our ability to understand these complex characteristics comes from God, Himself, we are likely to make them into causes that become greater than the God who we should be serving by engaging in their implementation.

So, justice is linked to kindness, kindness is linked to justice, and both are controlled by humility. We can know God’s standards and view of justice by seeking out His Word on everything. We must be willing to pursue justice in our world with the same zeal that God does. We should also develop a heart that is filled with Christ’s kindness, for this is what keeps the zeal for justice in check, and this is what makes us willing to take the time and to risk truly getting to know people at the heart level. Then it all becomes functional and balance is achieved when we humbly place our own drive, desires, and thoughts under the control of the Spirit. The result is a walk through life that has the grace and the fluid movement of a champion for Christ.

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God raised us up with Him and seated us with Him in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus, so that in the coming ages He might show the immeasurable riches of His grace in kindness toward us in Christ Jesus.

Ephesians 2: 6, 7

 

The idea of kindness brings out certain images in my mind. One of them is that classic picture of the young person (Well, the classic version says “Boy Scout,” but these are modern times where such specifics are generalized for the sake of inclusion. This is actually and usually a good thing, too,) Back to my story; this young person is helping the elderly person across a busy street. Another of these kindness events happens when we let the person with one item or with the baby in her arms who is behind us in line at a store go ahead of us. Kindness is picking up your neighbors tipped over trashcan and putting the former contents back into it. Kindness is too rare in our hurried and individualistic world. Yet, these ideas of what kindness is are shallow and weak in comparison to what Paul is describing.

 

Let’s face it; people are generally not very pleasant to be around. We deserved nothing but disappointment, anger, and condemnation from God. We come into this world dead in spirit, lost to eternity, and separated by a humanly impenetrable division from all that is loving, holy, and righteous. With full knowledge of all of this and with a heart that breaks with the experiencing of our rebellion, God chose to pursue us. He has the power and the ability to wipe us all out and to start over with a new model, but God decided to stay with His original creation. So, He provided us with the way and the means to make a decision ourselves. We can accept God’s loving gift of life that is granted to us through Christ’s life, death, and resurrection; or we can stay as we are and continue to live in the futility of our lost humanity.

 

When we accept Christ, we are changed. The dwelling place of our hearts, minds, and spirits is relocated from this world and its darkness into the realm of God Most High with its unceasing glory. God gave all for us, and He grants all that is worth having to us as His gracious gift. This is true kindness. Christ’s singular act of obedience to the Father is the pinnacle of self-sacrificial love, and all of that love is lavished upon us in the form of acceptance into ever present and eternal relationship with God. God’s acceptance of a dead-spirited, dark-hearted and rebellious soul like me stands as a testimony through time to His desire to heal the brokenness of each person in this world. Our lives also speak of the possibility for each of us to experience Christ’s deep healing and transformative change. This testimony is spoken most clearly when we choose to live with Christ openly and boldly on our lips and with His love as our foremost expression of His presence in us. As we treat other people and our world in this manner, we touch it with the immeasurable kindness of heaven.