And beginning with Moses and all the Prophets, he interpreted to them in all the Scriptures the things concerning himself.

Luke 24: 27


Jesus has been crucified. He was then placed into the sealed tomb but is no longer there. These two disciples are heading off toward the town of Emmaus when they encounter a stranger who joins them on the road and starts to talk with them. They explain their sadness and grief to him, and he begins to talk about Jesus with them. He possesses a depth of knowledge and a fullness of understanding that is amazing to the disciples. Even with all of this, they did not grasp who was with them until later that night when they sat down to a meal together and Jesus took the bread, blessed it, and broke it as He had while celebrating the Passover with them a few days earlier.


We look at this story and wonder how these disciples could have been so oblivious to who was with them. Perhaps we conclude that Jesus must have looked and even sounded very different than He did before. Yet, even when He explained the totality of Scripture to them in ways that made the presence of the Christ in it all fully apparent, they did not connect their companion with their teacher and close friend. How much like these disciples do we tend to be? If we have accepted Christ, He is present with us and dwelling within us; still, we are often oblivious to His truth and unresponsive to His direction for our lives. Like those men, we hear the words, but we do not grasp the real and tangible presence of their author or respond to His voice and to the Lord’s expressed will for us.


It seems to me that those disciples were so focused upon their own situation and the concerns that it caused them that they could not see beyond it to attend to the way that everything that was occurring in their lives was a part of God’s plan. Jesus spoke the truth of all eternity to them so that they could begin to understand that every word of the Scriptures was pointing to Christ and that all of life is to be dedicated to carrying out Christ’s calling for His disciples. If we open our ears to Him and yield our wills to His, we can enter into the same sort of peace that eventually came to the disciples as they realized who it was that they were engaged with in conversation and in travel through life. Christ reveals His truth and His will to us as we journey along our own roads with Him. He is present all of the time and in every situation or circumstance, for like those disciples, Christ is our companion and guide for the road that we will travel today.


All flesh is like grass, and all its glory like the flower of grass. The grass withers, and the flowers fall, but the word of the Lord remains forever.

1 Peter 1: 24, 25


Peter looks back across human history to cite words that Isaiah set down that were just as fresh and current in Peter’s day as they were when they were first written. Now, when we look at life in our times, they still apply. For we humans tend to spend a lot of time, energy, and focus a remarkable amount of attention on things which have a very short life and that don’t provide much in the way of real, lasting value. We develop our bodies and we even exercise our minds in ways that make them stronger. These are good endeavors; yet, most of that effort does nothing to gain us a clearer perspective on things that have eternal significance.


If we want to be involved in efforts that have a life span that exceeds the moment, and we desire to expend our energy on an activity that brings real benefit to ourselves and to others; then, the best investment that we can make is in time with God’s Word. As we read God’s Word, we gain understanding of the Lord’s viewpoint on our own life. As we talk to God about what He is saying, we become more intimate with Him, and He becomes more real to us. The pages of His Word are amazing and even mystical in that they contain meaning and wisdom that is far greater than the sum of the mere words. The Spirit of the Lord speaks to His people in and through the pages of the text. As we read them we are taken into the heart of the author of truth, wisdom, righteousness, and love.


Time invested in God’s Word, whether it is a single verse or a long passage, will always pay great rewards. All of the beauty of the universe is contained within, and that beauty is granted context and lasting significance by the touch of its Creator. As we seek out the author and desire to know His heart, God blesses us with His presence in our lives. When we choose to decorate our hearts with the flowers of the Lord’s love, grace, and mercy, He blesses every day of our lives with His eternal presence. God’s Word leads us to Him, and He, in turn, takes us into His Word as an important aspect of the journey of faith that is our life’s great calling in Christ. So, as we follow Christ, we bring the glory of His presence into our world in the form of the unfading mercy, grace, and love that God has poured into each of us.


For you, O LORD, have made me glad by your work;

at the works of your hands I sing for joy.

Psalm 92: 4


God was working out His will in the ancient world of the psalmists, and He is still doing the same to this day. From the dawn of time the Lord has been engaged with His creation on all levels; so, it is not surprising to me to see His hand at work in the affairs of the world where I live. God cares about each of us, and He is very concerned about the way that we live out our lives. This concern and engagement were so great that God, Himself, lived among us to provide everyone with the way and the means to enter into on-going and eternal peace with Him. That baby, Jesus, whose birth we celebrate was the singular greatest work that God’s hand of mercy and grace has accomplished; yet, that work was intended to bring joy to the hearts of people such as myself.


My greatest joy is known through the presence of Christ in the world where I dwell, and it is made very real by His Spirit as He dwells within me. For God’s redemptive work is carried out on a grand, universal scale in our world, and it is also rendered on an intimately personal scale within the lives of individuals as we enter into relationship with Christ. It is in and through this relationship that gladness is brought to life, and it is in the companionship of the Spirit that life with its ups and downs, its trials and challenges, is perceived as a joyous event. God works in us to change our perspective on the events and the circumstances of life so that all of it can be understood as valuable and useful in our journey of faith. I know that without Christ in me, I would view my days very differently than I do in light of God’s wisdom, truth, and love.


When I consider God’s gift of Jesus, I am not taken immediately into a seasonal story and the festive activities that tend to surround its telling. Instead, I am made humble and also filled with peace and the joy that the writer of this psalm is expressing. In Christ, I have come to know that joy is internally generated by Christ’s Spirit, and so the true and lasting source of my joy is Christ in me. He works to transform my perspective on life to one that seeks to bring His love into all that I think and do. Although my efforts along these lines are weak and highly flawed, I know that Christ is at work to redeem even my poor attempts at spreading His joy in the world.



In all wisdom and insight He made known to us the mystery of His will.

Ephesians 1: 8, 9


Most of us love a well crafted mystery with all of its plot turns and complex characters. This is the sort of story that keeps us guessing; in fact, the writers of these tales frequently work extra hard at making the real facts obscure and even at deliberately leading us to false conclusions. God’s mysteries are written with a different approach, for they are created with a very different intent, by an utterly unique writer, and with the desire that everyone will get the singular clue to its unraveling.


God has been laying the story out before us forever, and He has never been silent or tried to hide the clues to solving the mystery from us. In fact, the Lord is an author who actually goes after His audience, and He desires more than anything else to enter into a close relationship with us. Yet, the great mystery of eternity remains unsolved by vast numbers of people, and every day many see, hear, and are touched by the clues to its resolution; still, they reject the clues as false, they say that they are too busy dealing with life to take the time to think through the puzzle, or they believe that they already possess the true key to open the door of eternity.


In the end, the solution to God’s mystery is found in Christ, and there is no other way to gain access to the sort of wisdom that brings the deep secrets of the universe into a form that is comprehensible to our simple human minds. Because God knows all and understands us completely, in and through Christ He gave us the gift of His Spirit to guide us into His word and to clear away the darkness that sin placed around our hearts and minds. Then the Spirit walks with us through life to continually guide us further along the path of God’s will. However, unlike mysteries that are crafted by human writers, God wants us to spoil the ending by revealing the secret to the rest of the audience; thus, the greatest gift that we can give to others who are participating in this grand life play is not the typical respectful silence, but rather we can proclaim Jesus, the only answer that everyone needs, with every aspect of our lives.



May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, so that by the power of the Holy Spirit you may abound in hope.

Romans 15: 13


Hope is an amazing thing. It can take a seemingly impossible situation and bring a person through it when all tangible evidence would suggest that surrender was the only rational option. Hope seems to generate a sort of power for life and living that comes about out of that proverbial resource known as “Thin Air.” It is such a glorious thing that it is often likened to the sun and attached to the sense of possibility that arrives with its radiant appearance at dawn. Hope breathes life into the weak, it grants reprieve to the condemned, fills empty hearts with love, and defies reason and logic in doing it all. Hope is a gift, and its greatest expression in all of history is found in the Risen Christ as He goes from death into life and in so doing grants to us that same prospect and potential.


It is this hope, which is fulfilled in knowing Christ, that brings true joy and real peace into our hearts and minds. Although many forms of what is called joy surround us and its sources are made out of a very wide array of causes, none of them truly transcends all that life may throw at us over the course of our days. Also, if joy in its truest form is found in and through Christ, even more so this is true for that form of peace that settles deep in the soul and passes the through the tests that come to us all so that it is found to be genuine, enduring, and sound. This is a peace that redefines reality in terms that are framed in eternity and that are thus taken out of the realm of our control and management and are placed into the far more capable and caring hands of God. The presence of Christ in me has become the reason that I even begin to know and to dwell in the safety and the freedom that come out of knowing these gifts from the Lord that are identified as joy and peace.


So, back to hope. This is something that God has granted to us out of His unceasing and infinite love for us. The Lord is fully aware of the great challenges that each of us faces in life, and He desires to provide us with something that both takes us through those times and that grants to us the ability to endure all that comes our way in a manner that is distinctly different from the rest of the world around us. Christ’s hope places His followers into a new and a redeemed reality that looks beyond today into a future that is reshaped into the perfection of God’s creation plan. The joy and the peace that Christ infuses us with are resources that invigorate and revitalize us as we reach those points of great stress and strain that are a guarantee that comes with living in our world. They become most tangible as we turn our focus and attention away from ourselves and look upon the face of Christ so that the reality of His great love for each of us becomes the source for that enduring hope that releases us from the situation and the circumstances that surround us.


God shows his love for us in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us.

Romans 5: 8


What does it mean to be a sinner? Many of us have heard about and even memorized lists of sins, and the consequences that can come our way if we engage in them. These are not good things to think, say, and do; at least that is supposed to be the way that God views it all. In this view of things, sin is bad; so, not sinning is good. This approach tends to set up a form of tension between doing what we want to do and doing what we are informed that God would have us do. There is some truth to this, but this is also an ill-informed understanding of how God actually works and the design of life in His redeemed kingdom come.


In God’s perspective, sin is rejection. It comes about as people turn away from Him and from His righteousness in order to think and act as we want without regard for what that might do or cause to happen in the lives of others or in our world. Sin takes people away from God’s designed patterns of engagement with the rest of creation and redesigns the rules so that our own desires are met regardless of the consequences for ourselves or for others. It moves us ever farther away from the love, grace, and mercy that are inherent in God’s creation plan, and sin then builds up barriers between each person and God, and by virtue of God’s implanted image in all people, it also divides us one from another. This thing that is called sin is the singular most destructive force that exists in relationships and especially in that which can be formed between people and our Creator.


However, God is not willing to see this world and our lives remain in this state of separation and conflict. He did something about this state of affairs, and the Father did not wait to see how we might act or even for our responses to His approach to us. In advance of anyone’s turning toward Him, God formed a plan for the redemption of all of His creation, and that plan was focused on the restoration of deep and intimate relationship with anyone of us who would accept the opportunity and the offer of grace that was extended. Jesus, God Himself, perfect and blameless, would yield Himself to suffer all that every one of us deserved by way of penalty for our sinfulness. This was planned and executed while we were all still buried in sin and lost to eternity. Christ gave all as an advance to our accounts so that we could freely enter into the redemption of love that God tenders to us. In this new state, Christ works within us to transform our thinking and acting so that the tension of righteousness is reformed into the nature of our being.

If any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask God, who gives generously to all without reproach, and it will be given him.

James 1: 5


This thought makes me wonder about the times in which James lived. Was there more wisdom afoot then than there is now? You see, to me there just isn’t much of that great and Godly commodity visible in our world today. I don’t think that this is the result of my just hanging out in the wrong company or on the bad streets of my town, either. This unwise nature and function of people in general today is the product of deliberate choices that we have made. Unfortunately, lack of wisdom tends to inform the unwise, and the unwise frequently become the information experts for people who lack Godly wisdom themselves. This process of the clueless being counseled by the unwise isn’t just circular in nature, either; rather, it established a path of declension that heads ever further away from the truth.


The good news in all of this is that this downward path is changeable. Like a pilot is trained to take corrective actions when the plane is heading dangerously toward the ground, there are things that each of us can do to change the way that we are processing and responding to our world. Getting back to James and his statement, I think that he was posing a rhetorical question here in that I sincerely doubt that he was seeing all that much wisdom or that many wise people in his neighborhood either. The “if” refers to everyone in his day, and it calls me out and everyone else around me today. This is our problem as fallen people who live in a broken world. We lack God’s wisdom, and we don’t always realize just how much we are missing because of this state of being.


Yet, like that well trained pilot, we don’t need to crash and burn. We can do what our old friend James suggests here and seek out God and His wisdom of life. The Lord has placed it right before our eyes, and He has granted His presence in us and in our world to illuminate, illustrate, and explain His truths to us. We can read God’s Word on a very regular basis, and we can meditate and contemplate on what He is saying to each of us as we do this reading. The Spirit does speak and He will bring the eternal word of life into meaningful context for all that we are facing in the days to come in our world. As the old expression goes, in our relationships with God, “There are no dumb questions.” The Lord hears our doubts, concerns, and pleas, and He does answer them with the sort of wise truth that transforms our approach to life and that brings the order of Christ into our days so that we can give a touch of reason to the unwise environment around our doors.