For we know that if the earthly tent which is our house is torn down, we have a building from God, a house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens.

2 Corinthians 5: 1


As we live in this world today, Paul’s first statement above about the destruction of our earthly tents seems quite real and totally personal. Everyday and all around us we hear about and even experience events that take take hold of our lives with the iron grip of chaos, destruction, and loss. People’s lives are turned upside down, and we are thrown about by forces that we don’t control and by circumstances that slip up on us with the stealth of absolute darkness and the swiftness of demonic zeal. These events can take our homes, destroy our churches, and even shake our faith to the point of serious questioning of our relationship with God.


The Lord knows our world just as He knew the very similar one that Paul lived in; for, you see, the forces of evil have been loose on earth since the early days of our human history, and Satan wants to take our weak spirits into his hands and give us the sort of trials that strike us in our areas of greatest vulnerability. The Lord protects us, and He strengthens us so that we can handle these attacks. He also promises us with a certainty that is unshakable that this life and this world are not all that we have. In fact, the most magnificent structures and the greatest thoughts that we can enjoy in this life are nothing more than dim shadows of what we will experience in our next lives with God in Heaven.


Therefore, we need to remain hopeful despite everything that is happening in our world, and we need to continue to seek the face of God while in the center of our circumstances. It is this solid, tangible hopefulness that sets God’s people apart from the rest of humanity, and it is this ability to see beyond the moment to an eternal perspective that keeps us going on during times when our immediate world has been turned on its side. Our families, friends, neighbors, and communities are desperately looking for hopeful signs in these troubled times; so, people of faith who stay focused on the Lord’s promises can bring the light of salvation into their lives and the hope of eternity to their souls.



O LORD, make me know my end

and what is the measure of my days;

let me know how fleeting I am!

Psalm 39: 4


Let me say that David must have been in a very odd mood on the day that he set out these words. This is just not the sort of thing that I would want God to reveal for me, and David doesn’t strike me as a person who was more morbid than I am or than most others are either. Yet, he asks for an image, a picture, of where this life comes to its end as if that would appear on his calendar as one of those automatic prompts that self-populate mine. That would be strange and troubling; it might look somewhat like this, “Last Hour of Final Day of Life, Start: 4:00 P.M. End: 5:00 P.M.” In fact, I think that David is actually doing something very different than reflecting on the end of his days here; rather, he is actually entering into living his life more righteously and with clearer God-directed purpose.


This Psalm is a lament. The author is distressed and troubled by the way that his life is going, and he is also taking responsibility for the ways that it has gone off track. God has a plan for David’s life just as He has one for each of us. David admits to his own sinfulness and owns his frustrations with the outcome of those departures from righteous thought and action. As we read his thoughts, we are invited to join David in reflecting upon our own lives, and we are guided into owning the ways that we are turning away from God as we conduct life in a manner that we have determined and that we attempt to control outside of submission to God’s Word, His will, and the Spirit’s direction. So, considering the end of it all is of very real importance.


This is that point that we all will face where we no longer can change any of the course of our life. What we have done is completed, and the way that we will be remembered is established by those expressed thoughts and emotions, the deeds completed, and the others that were left undone. This is not stated as a form of defeatist resignation, but, instead, I see this sort of process as one in which we look at the place where we are in life, own the sin that is there, and submit it and the other aspects of our existence to following Christ in service to His Gospel. The place where we are on that track through our days doesn’t matter. If this is the last of those allotted hours, let them be lived in praise to God and for His glory. If there are thousands of days to go until that end, let them all be ones that are committed to Christ and to proclaiming Him in thought, word, and action. The specific moment of that final breath does not matter, what does count is the way that each of our breaths sing out praise and glory to the Lord!



Through him (our Lord Jesus Christ) we have also obtained access by faith into this grace in which we stand, and we rejoice in hope of the glory of God.

Romans 5: 2


It seems to me that if there is one thing that would make aa difference in the way that our world operates, that one thing might be the presence of more grace in our interactions and in our relationships. Now grace is an interesting concept, and it is a risky thing to engage in giving or receiving. Grace defies some of the rules of life that we all have learned, for it operates outside of the usual idea that all human interaction carries with it an inherent requirement that there be reciprocity. If I give something to you, then you are indebted to me until something of relatively equal worth is returned to me. This is the sort of platform upon which most of what we do and how we engage with each other is constructed. This give and take economy is where our world stands.


However, this is not where God is coming from in the way that He engages with His creation, in general, and with people, specifically.  In the beginning, He breathed life into us, and after we defied Him and went our own way into a universal journey of sin and its death, God came to us and provided Himself as our means of reentering the fullness of life. God asked for nothing in return as He poured out His grace upon our unworthy souls, and the only thing that Christ asked was that we be forgiven. Because of Christ and through God’s grace, anyone who turns to Him in repentance and submission is granted a new home in God’s Kingdom and a renewed purpose for this life in service to its King. Thus, in so living, we enter into our own hope of eternity wherein we will be covered in the glory of the Lord, but grace is still really for this life and it is about how we approach living today.


In Christ, we have received grace beyond our capacity or capability to measure it. There is no way to quantify or to compare this gift from God to anything else that we can perceive in this world. Yet, this grace that God has granted to us is intended to serve the purpose of setting us free from the bonds and the constraints that sin has imposed upon us. This is especially true when it comes to the way that we react to and interact with others. It seems to me that if we prepared out hearts to pour out grace upon people in all situations and under the wide range of circumstance in which we react to them in life, then this world would have a different tone and flavor to it. We might see others in a way that is more like Christ’s, and we just might find that other people start to understand some more of God’s gracious desire to redeem them. So, Lord, help me to stand today as a grace-soaked follower of Jesus and guide me to pour out that same infinite love upon others as an offering of grace given in worship to my King.

For God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish, but have eternal life.

John 3: 16


After a long journey, the band of travelers from the east arrive in the land of David; they go to Herod, for as the religious ruler of the country they thought that they could get specific directions to the location of the baby king that they had come to honor. But Herod was interested in personal gain, in power, and not in the souls of men; so, they went away from him, and they stayed away from his evil intent. These men were the philosophers and the spiritual counselors to their home country. They studied the stars and they predicted the future. They were the elite thinkers of their culture. Here they were in a foreign land, and they were very far from home; yet, the sense of adventure and the excitement of encountering the fulfillment of their prophetic studies had to be intoxicatingly powerful.


We, too, have all been on a long journey through life. We have all encountered various challenges and trials and roadblocks along the way. Yet, I have found that the presence of Christ remains constant throughout all. His glory shines even brighter than that star that the magi followed. Christ never stops calling to all people just as He has never stopped calling to me. Christ cares deeply about what I do and how I am living; still, these actions and thoughts of mine have never made any difference to Him in regards to His desire to lead me to truth, to integrity, to righteousness, and to love. Since I have known Jesus on the profoundly personal basis that He desires for all, the journey to God’s presence is a very short one, for His Spirit is a part of who I now am. Still, that journey can seem like the longest and the most challenging expedition that I could imagine; yet, that perception is my problem. God is here with me always; it is my heart that tries to shut him out. I am the one that tries to run and hide from Him and His truth.


For people who haven’t come to the decision to enter into a relationship with Jesus, the journey to Him is also, in fact, very short, for it is accomplished in the heart, not with the feet, and He is there waiting to enter into it with everyone. There are no special words and no magic spells required. God does love everyone, and Christ wants to complete that love by infusing every one’s heart with it. So, like the Magi, we come to the presence of Christ bringing gifts to honor the king, He wants us to bring Him a gift also. God wants us to give him the gift of our lives. He wants us to present our willingness to let him have control of our thoughts and our actions, and He asks for us to give Him our openness and willingness to live for Him. In turn, God gives us everything. He gives us His hope, grace, comfort, freedom, honesty, compassion, serenity, understanding, companionship, majesty, and joy. God gives us all of this and so much more, and all of this is ours always and forever.


So, I ask myself, where am I on this journey today? What is it that I am holding onto out of fear or stubbornness or some other personal motive; what does God want me to lay at His feet as my gift of self? As I fall down before the King in worship, I challenge myself to accept Christ’s gifts to me, to live like they are my reality, and like the Magi did, I am to go into my own world to tell of this gracious love that fills my heart and that gives me my true purpose in life.


God is spirit and those who worship him must worship in spirit and in truth.

John 4: 24


Sometimes we think of worship as something that takes place at specific times and in specified places. It is something that we do on our day of gathering and it happens in church. Yet, that is not even remotely how God intends for us to view this aspect of our relationship with Him. Worship is an expression of the way that we view its object, in this case God, and it is a means of taking the beliefs and the feelings that we have regarding God and making them known. God commands us to worship Him, but His heart desires that these commands would be fulfilled by us out of a sincere desire and even from a need to let out what is contained within us. The Lord wants for us to respond to His love, grace, mercy, and the rest of His character and nature by entering into this thing that we refer to as worship.


The character and the nature of God are much too large, great, and all-encompassing to be confined to a specific time or to be considered as a part of what happens in a designated place. God is not an object that we can place on a shelf, pedestal, or the wall and come to when we decide that we should engage in religious practices. His nature as spirit makes God impossible to contain or to curtail in this manner. The Lord is present and is sovereign ruler everywhere on this earth and in the universe. There is no place where He is not present and there is nothing over which He does not have final authority. This means that we can bring all that is before us in life to Him and that we can trust God with our most precious and deepest aspects of our minds, hearts, and souls. God rules over all with the sort of Creator’s love that seeks after the healing for all that is broken and for the redemption of all that is lost.


So, worship is something that takes place everywhere and in all of the circumstances where God is present, which means that for a follower of God, worship in its true form is a part of the totality of life. As we breath, so, also, we can worship the Lord who gave us each of those breaths. The realization of God’s total sovereignty and also of the absolute totality of His presence is the foundation for entering into God’s truth. There is only one author of truth in the universe, and the Lord is also the sole place to go to test the veracity of what we hear, how we are thinking, and the conclusions that we are forming about the conduct of life. Thus, seeking after truth is a form of worship, and doing this in submission to God’s Word and His Spirit is an expression of that worshipful heart. The Lord values truth as much as He does love, and He is blessed when we worship Him with lives that are dedicated to love, grace, mercy, justice, and truth.

I would hasten to my place of refuge from the stormy wind and tempest.

Psalm 55: 8


The experience of a storm is something that is common to all people; however, there is a wide range of pleasure and discomfort in those experiences. In fact, each of us encounters times when the storm brings refreshing energy into our lives and others when it causes concern that can readily turn into panic. A lot of the difference is the result of how much we feel either in control or out of it and how much fear we have concerning the amount of damage that the storm might cause.


When we try to take on the swirling winds and the driving rain by ourselves, and the strength and the wisdom that we need to survive it all are coming from personal resources, there will always be a less than desirable result. We may make it through some days, and we may hold it all together for some period of time; but, in the end, the forces that are driving the winds will overcome us. Yet, there is a calm, safe, and available place to go where strength is more than restored and where the wisdom of eternity is provided to everyone who is humble enough to seek it.


The Lord does not tell us to stay safely inside our houses and to avoid those strong winds and the flying debris that are found out in our world. Rather, He wants us to find our footing, base our thinking, and plan the adventure that is daily life from the perspective of the calm of His word and with His Spirit to hold onto. The Lord is the refuge that we have to go into when life is too much to handle, and He is the One who will take us back out into the world’s tempest so that we can bring that settling grace that is found in Christ’s presence into it our world’s stormy nights.


And I will pour out on the house of David and the inhabitants of Jerusalem a spirit of grace and plea for mercy, so that, when they look on me, on him whom they have pierced, they shall mourn for him, as one mourns for an only child, and weep bitterly over him as one weeps over a firstborn.

Zechariah 12: 10


We like it when things are easy, when everything is going well and everyone around us is happy and content. Yet, that is really not the reality that most people get to deal with. Life is not smooth, and the path that we travel through it is frequently interrupted by detours that are caused by broken dreams and failed aspirations. Although we would like to point to the condition of the world as thee cause for our troubles or hold up others as the problem, if truth is to be told, each of us needs to take ownership of our own contribution to the way that things are today and for the place that we occupy in our world. We have all sinned, and each person has done things, thought thoughts, and carries attitudes that diminish the quality of life in the space that we inhabit. There is no one alive who does not need the grace that God has to give to us, and none of us are too far gone to receive the mercy that comes our way through Christ.


Zechariah is describing a time when his entire nation would be overcome by the need for repentance and a desire to return to being focused upon worshiping the Lord. I fear that this sort of national transformation is highly unlikely short of Christ’s return, and even then, it will not be the existing nations that turn in full to Christ, but rather, He will replace all that is here with His singular restored holy and just kingdom. In the interim, each of us continues to dwell in this land, and we are asked by Christ to push on in our journey of faith, hope, and trust. This is where the same grace and mercy that the prophet describes are so vitally important to us, for I believe that without God’s grace and His mercy it is essentially impossible to continue to live out our days with faith as the foundation for each step that we take, with hope as the reason for going forth, and with trust in Christ as the source of strength for the journey.


For me, this all starts with repentance. When I consider all that God has done in order to draw near to me, a person who has too often pushed Him away or attempted to keep the Lord at a safe distance from the most personal and closely held aspects of my life, my knees collapse and my heart fills with tears of remorse as I seek Christ’s forgiveness. Yet, this is something that I already possess, and as I recognize my need for grace, I also see that it has been poured out over me as an anointing with the holy oil of forgiveness. It is here, where my sinful life meets Christ’s cross of redemption, that my penitent’s tears are wiped away and are replaced by a strength and an understanding of purpose that are provided to me by Christ, Himself. The hope that I have for the land where I live and for the world where we reside is found in the power of Christ as He leads His people to live righteously and to engage directly with the various issues and concerns of our day while pouring out upon others the same grace that we have received and  by approaching everyone and each situation with open hands that are filled with mercy and with love. This is how we can take Christ into the center of the Jerusalem in which we dwell.



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