For thus sys the LORD to the house of Israel:

      “Seek me and live;

           but do not seek Bethel,

        and do not enter into Gilgal

            or cross over to Beersheba;

        for Gilgal shall surely go into exile,

            and Bethel shall come to nothing.”

Amos 5: 4, 5

In a strange sort of way one of the markers of humanity’s creation at the hand of God alone is our long-standing ability to ignore the obvious in order to do what it is that we want to do instead. In the days of Amos, God was very real and visibly present with the people of Israel. The history of all that the Lord had accomplished in establishing them as a nation was rather fresh in their national and personal memories. They could name ancestors that were born during the wilderness days and had crossed over the Jordan in that miraculous moment in which God demonstrated His power and His grace. Now, they had moved away from worship of the Lord as their one and their only God as they were regularly going to temples to place offerings upon alters dedicated to various other gods. Thus, God’s own people were traveling to Bethel, Gilgal, and Beersheba in order to bow down before and to seek favor from these other forms of so-called deity.

Do we not continue to do the same sorts of things today? We may not build elaborate buildings to house stone, bronze, and golden images of our various gods, but we do worship at their altars. The fashion of the day may call them by names such as government, wealth, military might, social power, or career. We can usually make arguments as to the worthiness or even as to the essential nature of the attention that is given to these aspects of life. Yet, the sort of devotion that is often granted to them is much like that which is described by God’s Word as the form of worship that was to be given to God alone. At issue is not the fact that we have devised systems of civil governance, means of earning a living, or even an organized military presence that is tasked with standing up to evil in our world; rather, the issue is the importance that is given to any of these entities and activities. When they become primary in our minds and in our hearts, then they have taken the place of God in our individual and our collective beings.

God is patient with us, and His blessings continue to be poured out upon His people. But this will not continue indefinitely. When Amos wrote his words of stern warning, things were going well in Israel and in Judah. There was wealth and prosperity in that land, and the next great peril in the form of Assyria was a weak and incapable neighbor far to the north. Yet, all of that would change very rapidly, and before too long both Hebrew nations would be overwhelmed and made captive. Our fate today will not necessarily look like that of Israel and Judah; yet, God has promised that a day of reckoning is to come soon. We will each be forced to respond to Christ with an accounting for the conduct of our lives, and He is a judge that knows all and one that hands out true and complete justice. We each individually and collectively as Christ’s church have choices to make. We can reframe our hearts and redirect our minds so that our devotion and worship is focused on God alone or we can expect to answer to Christ for why we chose to leave our best selves upon those pagan altars instead.

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