Let the favor of the LORD our God be upon us,

   and establish the work of our hands upon us,

   yes, establish the work of our hands!

Psalm 90: 17

This is a song that is credited to Moses and that seems to reflect aspects of the story of the Egyptian exodus, for its background is one of trials and hard times. Still, it is a song about hope, filled with the prospect of the Lord’s provision, and one in which God’s people look to Him as their source of wisdom and truth. When these people seek God’s favor, they are trusting that He has good things in mind for them; so, they also desire to have the Lord guide them into the types and the forms of the work that they will do in service to God. It is through this relationship with God that they are defined as a group of people and as individuals within that greater whole. Then, the work that the Lord guides them into doing and equips them to accomplish provides the means to apply their sense of self to redemptive and restorative acts in the world around them.

When they were held captive in Egypt, they did what their masters demanded, and they lived in a manner that was controlled by the oppressive force that was exerted by others. After they turned to God and were set free by His hand, the Israelites were given a form of freedom that should have granted to them the opportunity to establish a nation that worshiped the one true God openly and continuously and that was a beacon of light and a source of redemptive hope to all other people in the world. This was not to be so, for sin is tenacious, and the people would not release their past comforts and fears sufficiently to trust God fully in all matters. Yet, when they did reach the point of breaking under the burden of attempting to live with one foot set upon God’s will and the other planted in the sandy soil of self-determination, they were able to seek the Lord’s guidance and provision in all matters. So, the words of this song are sung with sincerity and in real expectation of God’s answer.

This ancient story is really not so much about Moses and the people that he led out of captivity twenty five or so centuries ago. For it does not seem to me that our world is all that different from theirs. We can be people who know God and that speak Christ and even sing songs of praise to His name on a regular basis; yet, there is something holding us back from living out the freedom that the Lord has granted to us by the cross and through the cleansing of His precious blood. It is as if we are fearful of letting go of that captive past in its entirety; thus, we cling to the prospect of returning to aspects of life as it was before we knew Christ or that are governed by the rules of life that have been developed out of worldly thinking and a self-centered form of relating to others. In these times, we can repent of our stubborn clinging to the past while singing Moses’ song as we seek that the Lord’s favor, that is, His grace, love, mercy, justice, and righteousness, would pour out over us and that His nature and character would inform and guide all that we are and do. Then the works of our hands, the thoughts of our minds, and the orientation of our hearts can be set along that same God-ordained path of bringing redemption, peace, and salvation to the troubled people and places in our world today.