Honor the LORD with your wealth

   and with the firstfruits of all your produce.

Proverbs 3: 9

These thoughts of reflection on this proverb need to come with a warning attached. So, to be open and honest, the reader should bear in mind the fact that I am a pastor and specifically that I am responsible for the area of finance for a church. Thus, the things that I say about what God’s people should do with their wealth could be thought to hold an inherent bias toward giving it all to the church. Well, you have been warned. It seems that a good starting point for these thoughts is to be found in a definition of wealth. Merriam-Webster defines it as, “abundance of valuable material possessions or resources.” I agree with this with the possible exception of the use of the word abundance, for I think that each of us has something that can be referenced as wealth, but not all of us possess this in equal or in great amounts. Our wealth is the sum total of our financial resources in combination with our intellectual, spiritual, and emotional ones. These are then combined with skills, knowledge, and wisdom to form up the wealth that an individual has to use and to share with the world.

So, when Solomon says that we are to honor the Lord with our wealth, he is speaking of something much greater than just the money that we may have or obtain over time. When he says that we are to honor the Lord with it he is also advancing the concept far beyond the act of giving or donating funds to the church or even to the work of serving in the various ministries of God’s global kingdom. To me, honor suggests worship; it is an expression of praise, respect, and participation in God’s calling to proclaim the gospel of Christ to all peoples in every corner of the world. Thus, we honor the Lord when we seek out His will for the use and the distribution of the money that we have, of our time, with the skills and the understanding that we have acquired, and with all other assets that are under our control. God’s underlying desire is for each of us to be so committed to Him out of our deep love and respect for Him that we are truly seeking to follow the Lord’s lead and to take His direction in giving away the totality of our lives, that is our very being, to His use in service to God’s kingdom.

That defines the firstfruits of our produce in a more complete manner than does Solomon’s contextually appropriate agricultural example. The idea of giving the first harvest of our crops to the Lord involves trust and reliance, for there is no surety to the grower that the rest of the crop will be successfully harvested, and the first picking is generally the sweetest and the richest of them all. These are the premium grapes, the fattest heads of grain, and the most robust of the lambs and calves. The same elements of trust and reliance apply to the broader concept of wealth that has been set out here. The Lord desires for us to dedicate our best thinking, our strength and wisdom, the first of our time, and our pre-tax earnings to His purposes and use. This service of worship may be carried out in a formal ministry setting, but it may also be done in our homes or at our place of employment. The point is that the Lord wants His people to worship Him with each and every breath that we breathe and with all of the thoughts, words, and actions that we produce during the course of our lives. This sort of deep worship is carried out with prayer, under the guidance and direction of the Holy Spirit, and with the counsel of God’s Word. This expression of total commitment is the form and the type of honor that the Lord desires to receive from each of us as we dedicate all of our wealth to bringing glory to His name.  

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