Behold, his soul is puffed up, it is not upright within him,

   but the righteous shall live by faith.

Habakkuk 2: 4

The prophet was looking ahead into a future that would hold many challenges for people who follow God. There were powers in the world that were to be feared, and these nations had rulers that were greedy, prone to the use of extreme violence, and looking out toward other nations with an eye focused on conquest. The world was not a calm or a safe place, and many of the leaders of both the religious and the secular aspects of the nation of Judah were uncertain about how they should respond to all of these threats and the potential for threats that were so visible just beyond the horizon of sight and time. In this verse, Habakkuk is probably referring to the rising world power of Babylon and specifically to its king. It is his soul that is “puffed up;” so, the soul of the nation is also one that is defined by greed and arrogance to the degree that it has become self-important and operates outside of God’s guidance and righteousness.

This king is the sort of bright and shining star in the arena of politics that draws people into his sphere of influence. It is easy to see the success and to be taken in by the charm of power when it seems to be able to overcome many of the perceived ills of the world. In the days of the prophet, the great power in the world was Assyria, and their rule was accomplished through brutal violence and by virtue of a practice of bring about the total destruction of those that opposed them. Babylon was the rising nation to the east, and its approach to power seemed far more enlightened and compatible with achieving the peaceful outworking of a lasting and a beneficial relationship. Even if the king of Babylon was devoted to other gods and despite the fact that the nation was likely to seek to dominate others just as all of its predecessors had done, many of God’s people were drawn to the power, wealth, and accomplishment that they saw portrayed as an outward image. So, they were willing to look only upon the surface and not probe too deeply into the heart and the soul of the man.

This is Habakkuk’s warning. God’s people need to dwell in the realm of the deep. We must look beyond the glitter and the surface charms into the heart of the leader, and this is something that none of us are capable of doing without the involvement of the Holy Spirit in the process of searching and considering what and who are true, just, and righteous. These sorts of times are ones wherein our faith is truly tested. These are days when we are called upon by God to defy what might be common choice and popular courses of action in order to seek out God’s will in matters of civil governance and rule. This approach to making personal decisions and to seeking to inform and to influence the decisions of others may place a follower of Christ in a position of opposition to others who speak of the same relationship with God as we possess. Although we must remain loving and respectful in all thoughts and expressions of our beliefs, we also need to be bold as was Habakkuk in speaking out when we see wrong being perpetrated and as we see people heading into the trap of following power and dominion as if they were the marks of God’s blessing and His seal of authority.  

Advertisements