Therefor we must pay much closer attention to what we have heard, lest we drift away from it.

Hebrews 2: 1

 

Let’s face it, we do not like to be told to pay attention. The internal response to such an admonition is to say, “I am listening! I heard every word that you said!” Yet, our actions often make a lie of those assertions, for we do not actually do what we were instructed to do. All of this is human nature, and it is something that most of us encounter on a rather regular basis from both sides of the interchange. When the subject in question is salvation, and the person being discussed is Jesus Christ, the issue becomes much more serious. That is what the author of Hebrews is discussing here. Jesus is the singular one who is superior to any and to all angels, and His way to relationship with God is superior to any other way that might have been set out prior to His coming to dwell among us and His death and victorious rising up in defeat of Satan.

 

In the days when Hebrews was written, there were people who were teaching numerous ways to get into a relationship with God. This is still the case today. There are prophets and seers in our world who claim to be inspired by angels and by other forms of divine revelation so that the way to god that they espouse is claimed to be the only true and effective one to follow. Yet, none of these angels, prophets, or teachers of human-devised wisdom can attest to the fact that they were placed here by the direct hand of God, that they lived among us, were taken and tried and still found blameless by humanity, were put to death and buried, and then were alive walking among us and ascending into Heaven. This well-attested to narrative is the singular one that demonstrates the presence of God in a man and that presents this same man as the One who can take each of us out of the state of eternal death that is our birthright and place us before God Himself as Jesus proclaims us to be holy and righteous. Thus, we are found and adjudged to be fully acceptable to God and granted an eternal home with Jesus in Heaven.

 

Yet, when we listen carefully to God’s Word of truth and life, we are also granted far more than just the wonderful and magnificent hope of eternity. We are also taken into a new life in this world and a new purpose for the days that we have to spend dwelling here. Christ has overcome all of Satan’s hold on life and on this world. Although brokenness is still present with us and evil remains to work its chaos and havoc among us, they no longer have ultimate power or control. When we accept Christ and submit to Him as Lord and Savior, we are also rejecting the ways of evil in our world. We are seeking to engage with life as people who love rather than hate, who show mercy instead of exerting power, who seek justice for all as opposed to using law as a tool for gain. In Christ, we can be motivated to a new economy of grace in all that we think, say, and do, for as we are new beings in Christ, we can strive to make the peace and the joy of Heaven the reality of our world here and now. This will never be an easy endeavor as there will always be opposition to such thoughts and actions. However, Christ also was subjected to rejection, conflict, and opposition. As He went before us then and does go before us now, He will lead us into His victory over the forces of evil in this world.