Do not trust in these deceptive words, “This is the temple of the LORD, the temple of the LORD, the temple of the LORD.”

Jeremiah 7: 4

 

As Christians we may think that we hold some form of special place in our world where we have a historically long-standing position of authority in setting the direction for our society. We just might believe that others should listen to us because of what we claim to believe and in light of our sworn affiliation with God’s Word or with the church. I submit to you that this thinking is erroneous and also that it is damaging to our ability to truly follow Christ’s calling upon us in our world. It seems that Jeremiah is either quoting some form of formulaic oath or that he might be stating a belief that the temple itself held God’s power in a way that made it and its name into a form of talisman that could be used to accomplish the personal desires of people.

 

Most of us would readily agree that either of those ideas is wrong and that they are, in fact, rather foolish. Yet, we Christians often enter into equally shallow and wrong-headed thinking. We complain about our world and denounce our culture for their godlessness while holding bitter attitudes regarding the lack of an audience for what we want to say. We wring our hands and speak about God’s judgment when we are assembled together while silently gliding through our days as if we are afraid of someone in our social and work lives seeing us as one of those “crazy Christians” who takes what the Bible says literally. In fact, as it was for God’s people in Jeremiah’s day, our words matter, but our thoughts and actions are of much greater importance.

 

So, I think that this was the Prophet’s point here. What we say, the oaths that we might swear, and the outward affiliations that we claim are meaningless when it comes to our witness for Christ in our world if what we do and the motivation that drives our actions are not in conformity with God’s will, word, and character. Christian witness follows after God in that it needs to be relational. Christ is proclaimed when we step in to care for the weak, the marginalized, the powerless, and the unlovely in our midst. As we sacrifice our comfort and our wealth in order to reach out in love to people who may need food or shelter but who also desperately need a Savior, we bring Christ’s presence into another corner of our world. Thus, it is in loving engagement with our world in the name of Christ that our place of true significance in our world is defined and established.

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