When one says, “I follow Paul,” and another, “I follow Apollos,” are you not being merely human?

1 Corinthians 3: 4

 

Leaders are supposed to be people who we follow. This is a reality that most of us accept. In fact, it is something that individuals, organizations, and whole societies study and attempt to improve upon. As most of us regularly find ourselves in positions of leadership of one sort or another, there are books on the subject of leadership being published every minute of the day. Teaching us how to lead, and how to follow, for that matter, is a lucrative business. In light of this reality, why is Paul having a problem with these folks in Corinth and their desire to follow a leader of their choosing? Also, while I am at this process of questioning the Apostle, what gives with his concern over us being “merely human?” After all, that is what we are.

 

The problem that the men and women of Corinth had is much the same as the one that most of us also encounter. We lose sight of the true nature of the job that our leaders are called to perform, and we fail to look beyond that individual in order to examine the source of the authority that has placed her in this position of leading. Yet, I think that this human tendency toward short-sightedness is the source of a great deal of the tension and the difficulty that we encounter in working together in our various organizations and cultural structures. We expect that our leaders will be perfectly motivated and absolutely well-equipped to handle the task at hand. Yet, we fail to grant them the respect that should be theirs based upon the true authority that has placed them in that position. In other words, we have lofty desires for them to make our lives easier, more profitable, and better in all ways while we continually complain about their lack of clear vision and ability to get the job done.

 

Although we do follow human leaders who function at all levels of our society and the positions that they occupy have been created by various rules and regulations, God makes it very clear that He is the author and the real power behind all rulers and forms of governance. The structures that we use to create order in our cultures have been granted to us by God so that we can maintain a peaceful and a cooperative existence on the earth. If we believe that this is true, we need to look beyond the person and above the office in order to accurately assess the standards of ethical and moral behavior that should be expected out of our leaders. God grants the office to them, and He sets the standards for them to follow. The Lord also demands that we respect His appointments while clearly expressing our desires for them to rule righteously. In Christ we are called to be something much greater than merely human. For as we are in Christ, we also have His mind, we can know His ways and comprehend His vision. We are followers of the one true and absolute ruler of all, Jesus the Risen King.